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Why Your Friends Expect Free Work While Strangers Get Paid: The Psychology Behind It


Have you ever been asked by a friend to work for free or at a discounted rate, only to find out they paid someone else more money for the same service? It's a frustrating situation that many people find themselves in. So why is it that friends seem to want us to work for free or for less while being willing to pay more for the same service from a non-friend? Let's take a look at some possible reasons.


1. They think it's okay to take advantage of a friendship

Unfortunately, some people see their friends as an opportunity to save money, rather than as a valued business relationship. They may think that because you're friends, you should be willing to work for free or at a discounted rate. This can be especially frustrating if you've put in a lot of work and effort into building your skills and business.


2. They don't understand the value of your work

When friends ask you to work for free or at a lower rate, it can be a sign that they don't take your business as seriously as they should. One of the main reasons that friends might ask you to work for free is that they simply don't understand the value of your work. They may not fully appreciate the time, effort, and expertise that goes into the services you provide, and therefore may not see the need to pay for it. Or they may not fully understand the value of your skills and expertise, and therefore may not be willing to pay what your services are actually worth. This can be a sign that you need to better communicate the value of your services and the hard work that goes into running your business.


3. They assume you'll be willing to do it for free

Another reason that friends might ask for free work is that they assume you'll be willing to do it. They may think that because you're friends, you'll be happy to help them out without expecting payment.


4. They may not want to damage the friendship:

On the other hand, some friends may be hesitant to hire you or pay for your services because they don't want to damage or jeopardize the friendship. They may worry that if they pay you and something goes wrong, it could harm your relationship. Or they may feel that if they pay you, it could cause tension or awkwardness in the friendship. This can be especially true if your friend is on a tight budget and feels like they can't afford your services.



So, what can you do about it?


1. Set clear boundaries

It's essential to set clear boundaries with your friends when it comes to your business. Let them know what you're willing to do for free and what you expect to be paid for. Communicate the value of your skills and expertise, and explain why you can't work for free or at a discounted rate.


2. If you offer a discount, do so with clear terms

If you're open to offering a discount to friends, make sure you establish clear terms. Let them know what the discounted rate is and what services are included. Also, set a limit on how many times you'll offer the discount, so it doesn't become an expectation.


3. Communicate the value of your services

Make sure your friends understand the value of your services and the hard work that goes into running your business. Share testimonials from other clients and explain the time and effort that goes into providing quality services.


4. Be confident

Confidence is key when it comes to negotiating with clients, including friends. Be clear about your prices and services and stick to your boundaries. Your friends will respect you more if they see that you value your skills and expertise.


In conclusion, it's not uncommon for friends to want you to work for free or at a lower rate than they would pay a non-friend. This can be due to a lack of understanding about the value of your services, a desire to save money, or a fear of damaging the friendship. By setting clear boundaries, communicating the value of your services, and being confident in your prices, you can ensure that your friends respect and value your skills and expertise.



 



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